Why Santa’s Restaurant Marketing Is Better Than Your’s

Joel Cohen’s Wow Street Marketing Report features a great marketing template for any restaurant or retailer and it’s based on Santa Inc. Subscribe to this weekly restaurant marketing report by clicking here.

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Want Your Restaurant To Rank Well In Google?

There’s some substantial proof that having a keyword rich URL can definitely enhance the odds of getting a better ranking on Google for your specifically targeted keyword phrases.

While all of you have secured domains/websites using your restaurant’s name, (example – www.texassteakhouse.com) you should also consider securing domain names that contain the specific keyword phrases that users type-in to search for a restaurant in your category and geographical area. How do you know what people would type-in to do a search for you? For the most accurate answer, just ask your guests!

As an example, when I’m searching for an Italian restaurant in my area, I would type-in, “Italian Restaurant North Raleigh.”

If you secured the domain, “ItalianRestaurantNorthRaleigh.com”, and copied mostly everything from your original site over to form an additional new web site, then there would be a good chance that new web site, “www.ItalianRestaurantNorthRaleigh.com” could be ranked well for that keyword phrase.

In addition, there’s also evidence that having your targeted keyword phrase placed within the general makeup of your URL, also enhances the odds of getting a better ranking.

So domains like “BestSteakhouseSouthBendLaSalleGrill.com” (note the formula — keyword phrase + location + restaurant name) may also work.

If popular generic domain names that target your keyword phrase are not available, like “BestItalianRestaurantNorthRaleigh.com”, then just add a word like, “Your,” “The,” “Award Winning” or “Our” to it. (“YourBestItalianRestaurantNorthRaleigh.com”) and check for that availability.

In any case, a domain name with your keyword phrase, customized with your geographical area and restaurant name is a sure bet to be available — (“YourBestPizzaRestaurantNorthRaleighFlyersPizza.com”).

With search being the new yellow pages, take advantage of every tactic available to help you get online visibility. And, the cost of purchasing a number of domains? Peanuts when compared to getting found online by new guests.

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Restaurant Marketing: Promotions For October

Restaurant Marketing Promotions

October is National Pizza Month and National Chili Month.

For beverage marketing, October
offers Liqueur Day, Frappe Day and Vodka Day.

Food related days include: Chicken
Cacciatore Day, Fried Scallops Day, Greasy Food Day, Gumbo Day,
Pasta Day, Seafood Bisque Day, Taco Day and Vegetarian Day.

Desserts include: Angel Food
Cake Day, Boston Cream Pie Day, Brandied Fruit Day, Candy Apple
Day, Caramel Custard Day, Chocolate Cupcake Day, Chocolate Day,
Dessert Day and Pumpkin Cheesecake Day.

Special days for the month include
Boss’s Day, Mother-In-Law Day and Navy Day.

Here is the promotional rundown
for October:

National Caramel Month
National Chili Month
National Cookie Month
National Pizza Month
National Bullying Prevention Month
National Fire Prevention Month
National Work And Family Month
Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Italian Heritage Month

1 – World Vegetarian Day
2 – National Fried Scallops Day
3 – National Caramel Custard Day
3 – Techies Day
4 – National Vodka Day
4 – National Taco Day
5 – World Teachers Day
6 – Mad Hatter Day
9 – World Egg Day
9 – Fire Prevention Day
10 – National Angel Food Cake Day
12 – Columbus Day
12 – Thanksgiving (Canada)
12 – National Gumbo Day
14 – National Dessert Day
14 – Take Your Parents To Lunch Day
15 – National Chicken Cacciatore Day
16 – National Liqueur Day
16 – Boss’s Day
17 – National Pasta Day
17 – Wear Something Gaudy Day
18 – National Chocolate Cupcake Day
19 – National Seafood Bisque Day
21 – National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day
22 – National Nut Day
23 – National Boston Cream Pie Day
24 – National Bologna Day
24 – Make A Difference Day
25 – World Pasta Day
25 – Mother-In-Law Day
27 – American Beer Day
27 – Navy Day
28 – National Chocolate Day
29 – National Oatmeal Day
29 – National Cat Day
29 – Internet Day
31 – Halloween
31 – National Candy Apple Day
31 – Magic Day

Source: RestaurantNews.com

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Restaurant Marketing Report: What You Missed

Restaurant Marketing Report: Here are the top Wow Street Marketing Report issues you may have missed in August and September

The Wow Street Restaurant Marketing Report  is “intelligent restaurant marketing for intelligent restaurant owners and executives.

Subscription information is at: www.RestaurantMarketing.com/newsletter.html

1. 45 Topics To Post On Facebook

2. Your Exclusive Secret Weapon For Success

3. Troops & Vets: The Right Thing To Do From Tijuana Flats

4. How To Be The Only Game In Town

5. New Study: Customers Say A Story Actually Improves Food Quality

6. If It Doesn’t WOW, It’s Boring. Is Your Restaurant Boring?

7. What The Parents Want: The Two Minute Drill

7. It’s Raining. Are You Soaking Your Customers?

8. Your Burgers Are Screaming A Story. How To Sell More Of Any Product

9. They’re Still Alive: Marketing Lessons From The Grateful Dead

10. Two Highly Successful Strategies To Follow For Success

11. The Angus Barn: The Church Of The Dining Experience (series of three)

The Wow Street Restaurant Marketing Report is a concise, to the point, no BS, 35-second read; great insight into building your restaurant or retail business. For intelligent restaurant marketing, subscribe and get 4 issues per month, click here.

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Your Road To Succes For 2015: How To Get There

It's the holiday season; business has slowed down and this Monday is the first real work week of the year. Are you ready to re-new, re-invent, get re-vitalized? Or you going to do the same stuff as last year, expecting different results. The clients that I coached this past year, both restaurants, hotels, retailers and manufacturers all had great years – sometimes it's tough to get where you want to go without a little nudging. So, what about you?

Want a nudge? Need some coaching to keep you on your journey towards success? Here's my "menu of services."  Let me know if you need a "nudger."

1. One on one performance coaching – helping you get where you want to go, because it's difficult to do it on your own.

2. Group performance coaching – with other peers, no geographical conflicts, giving owners and CEO's and chance to meet and talk to others via videoconference sessions

3. WOW Restaurant/Hospitality Newsletter – a weekly 35-second read of intelligent marketing for intelligent restaurant/hotel/restail owners and executives.

If you're interested in any of these and want 2015 to be "your year," then email me a (written in full) – jcohen at restaurantmarketing dot com

Remember, this year, it's "your turn." Don't get caught up in the definition of insanity.

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Restaurant Marketing: It’s In Details

Restaurant Markteting: One of the things the Disney Institute teaches is that it's all about the small details. The doorknobs, the parking lot, the washrooms, the floors, the lighting, the music and so much more. Everything has to work in concert. But it needs the right conductor.

When I had my advertising agency in Houston, we handled the Landry's Seafood Restaurant account. CEO Tilman Fertita was all about detail. Everything in his restaurant concepts had to fit. Nothing was missed. It was great training for me. I picked up on that "detail concept." I notice everything about a restaurant, from the inside out. Does it work? What does it do for the customer? How does it affect the experience? And, most important, how can you make it better than what it is now?

It's one of the reasons I do "Restaurant Dream Tours." We tour your restaurant and others and see how they do it … and don't do it.

Many restaurants get it right in Houston, which makes it a great restaurant city. My newest discovery there is The Backyard Grill.  

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Restaurant Marketing: Why Do Servers Use The Same Lines?

Restaurant Marketing: Why do servers use the same lines like, "Are you still working on that?" Is there some kind of a servers handbook where these worn out phrases that you hear in most restaurants originate from? 

I love servers. They've got a difficult task to please people … some people who are even jerks and come in with a bad attitude. But, on the other side, they've got their own little business inside the restaurant. What a business to have! They don't have office rent, don't have inventory, don't have the typical costs of running a business. Their business is a little area of the restaurant providing a great dining experience for those who are seated there … and for that they can get a well-deserved gratuity. They can make as much money as they want, or as little as they want. Though I would suspect, if they're making little, they won't be around very long.

Unfortunately though, server jargon gets a little cliched, tired and boring. It's like servers have their own language that customers are supposed to understand. "Working on that?" Or, upon waiting for the meal to be delivered, "It'll be up in a sec."  What the hell's a "sec?"  Or, "you'll have it in a minute." Is that one minute as in 60 seconds, or three minutes or five minutes? Start counting.

So, if you're a server, I just have one request: You're doing a great job, I understand what you have to go through, but let's just not use the tired old sayings that we hear from every other server.

You're much better than that. Differentiate yourself from the others … you'll be remembered – and well rewarded.

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Good Morning Mr. Smith, Welcome Back! How are the Kids Enjoying Summer Camp?

Written by guest blogger, Jason Ostrander:

It's the little things that can really make your day. Tuesday Morning: I’m running late, and dying for a cup of coffee before I catch the subway into Hell’s Kitchen. Conveniently, a café is only 100 steps away from the front door of my place. This café is always extremely busy and being located in the heart of Spanish Harlem this particular location is often alive with loud conversation. You’re lucky when you get your order in the first try. I walk up to the counter and before I can even open my mouth I get a very cheerful greeting:

“Good Morning Mr. Ostrander, the usual? A large black coffee?”

I’m blown away. It’s the same feeling I get when I come home for the holidays and my parents embrace me and wait on me hand and foot with a 24/7 smile simply because I am gracing them with my presence.

Why was this act so powerful to me? Because I wasn’t at a small mom and pop establishment; instead I was straight in the heart of a corporate, turn-and-burn American eatery. I was at a McCafe – a good old McDonald's.

Now, I don’t particularly like McDonald's, but will I be back? Why? Because I’m no longer the Midwestern-tourist trying to fight my way through the crowd. Instead, I have become part of their club. A regular. Part of their special McDonald's family. Will I be back and stand in a longer line just to engage with the people that remember me? Absolutely.

I enjoy a second job as a "host" at a famed celebrity chef-owned Harlem restaurant.

It’s a Saturday night, and 200+ covers are on the books and another 150+ walk-ins will probably show up yearning for one of the few coveted tables. At any moment Denzel Washington or Jermaine Jackson might call for a last minute reservation. Stop. Let's take a minute and define a typical host’s role in a restaurant: Know little to nothing about the menu, manage reservations, greet guest, seat guest, smile and stand at the host stand until the guest leaves and then wish them farewell. This is NOT the way things are done here.

Instead of engaging with guests ten percent, we are expected be engaged with guests ninety percent – starting from the minute they walk in, during service and when they leave. In all honesty I probably seat guests for about one hour of my seven-hour shift.

The other six hours are dedicated to activating with customers, getting to know them, who they are, what they do, where they're from, how many kids they have and what they like to do, and making sure they are having the best experience. At the end of their meal, I handwrite a Red Rooster postcard with their names thanking them for making my job fun.

Why do all of this? Why take the steps to get to know your customer? Because when we can learn and remember details about customers, it makes the customer TRUST you.

Although I use restaurant examples, this 360-degree holistic approach to customer service is what will take your business or non-profit organization to the next level. Once you have your customer’s trust, they will follow you without question, taking your advice and suggestions.

At my restaurant I recently hosted two guests from Seattle. After genuinely getting to know them, I was able to suggest additional appetizers, desserts and specialty drinks. By the end of the night their bill had increased by over $100 – and what’s more impressive is that they were happy and willing to shell out that money while showering the staff with praise for the food and the EXPERIENCE.

I took their picture and bid them farewell with a personalized novelty postcard and my business card with a note instructing them to “give me a call should they ever be in NYC again and need help getting reservations.”

It’s the personal touches that can make or break your relationships with customers. Yes, you must also stand by your product or cause, but just as important is standing by your guests, treating everyone as if they’re a VIP. Focus on forging a personal relationship with your customer base and the sale will come naturally.

 Guest blogger is Jason Ostrander, son of Big Dave Ostrander. Jason recently earned his Master’s degree from Western Michigan University. He moved to New York City where he is an up-and-coming figure in restaurant marketing and public relations. He is the author of the blog: Aperitifs and Digestifs. Follow him online: www.aperitifsbyostrander.tumblr.com and on Twitter: @OstranderJason

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Restaurant Marketing: Nine Nuggets To Help You Market Your Restaurant

Restaurant Marketing: Here are nine marketing nuggets to help you market your restaurant – put your best foot forward, make that best impression …

  1. The secret to getting word of mouth is to have something interesting to talk about.
  2. What impresses one customer may be different than what impresses another customer.
  3. Every customer touch-point must be set up to impress a customer.
  4. Take a step outside of your restaurant and declare your restaurant to be boring.
  5. Once you can do that, take a tour of your restaurant with fellow staffers and maybe some friends and examine every area of your restaurant and ask, "what if?"
  6. Just because another restaurant is doing it, doesn't mean it's right for you.
  7. Good enough just isn't good enough any more.
  8. Guests are looking for something beyond the average; when they find it, they'll leave you in a heartbeat.

  9. There is no true loyalty in an email list or in Facebook Fans if all they are expecting from you are discounts.
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Restaurant Marketing: 5 Ways To Get The Attention Of Your Guests & They’ll Order Whatever You Recommend

Restaurant Marketing:  It's a challenge for a server to get the undivided attention of those at the table, but if he/she can control the table, get their full attention, they'll order whatever you want them to. Here are 5 easy ways to get their attention:

  1. Smile: Sounds easy, but when someone smiles at you, you notice it.
  2. Compliment Your Guest: "I really like your tie."
  3.  Special Information: Guests love information or special announcements, new products etc.
  4. Surprise: "You look really hungry, let me go ahead and put some hot fresh rolls on the table."
  5. Stories: Guests like to hear special stories about the restaurant, the owner or the chef.
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